TransNet: Minimally-Supervised Deep Transfer Learning for Dynamic Adaptation of Wearable Systems

Abstract

Wearables are poised to transform health and wellness through automation of cost-effective, objective, and real-time health monitoring. However, machine learning models for these systems are designed based on labeled data collected, and feature representations engineered, in controlled environments. This approach has limited scalability of wearables because (i) collecting and labeling sufficiently large amounts of sensor data is a labor-intensive and expensive process; and (ii) wearables are deployed in highly dynamic environments of the end-users whose context undergoes consistent changes. We introduce TransNet, a deep learning framework that minimizes the costly process of data labeling, feature engineering, and algorithm retraining by constructing a scalable computational approach. TransNet learns general and reusable features in lower layers of the framework and quickly reconfigures the underlying models from a small number of labeled instances in a new domain, such as when the system is adopted by a new user or when a previously unseen event is to be added to event vocabulary of the system. Utilizing TransNet on four activity datasets, TransNet achieves an average accuracy of 88.1% in cross-subject learning scenarios using only one labeled instance for each activity class. This performance improves to an accuracy of 92.7% with five labeled instances.

Publication
ACM Transactions on Design Automation of Electronic Systems (TODAES)
Ali Rokni
Ali Rokni
Graduate Alumni

Graduate Research Assistant.

Parastoo Alinia
Parastoo Alinia
Research Assistant

Graduate Research Assistant.

Mahdi Pedram
Mahdi Pedram
Research Assistant

I am a fourth year PhD student at Washington State University. I work as a research assistant with Professor Hassan Ghasemzadeh. My research topics include embedded systems, health monitoring systems, wearable sensor development, sensor data mining, power optimization, and machine learning. I received my B.S. degree in Computer Cngineering from Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran, Iran in 2014.

Iman Mirzadeh
Iman Mirzadeh
Research Assistant

I am a PhD student and Graduate Research Assistant at the Washington State University Embedded and Pervasive Systems Laboratory (EPSL) under supervision of Dr. Hassan Ghasemzadeh. I am interested in the real-world challenges of working with machine learning models such as energy constraints and human-in-the-loop interactions with these models. Specifically, I am focusing on Model Optimization (such as model compression), where my goal is to build more efficient models or use the existing models more efficiently. Before joining EPSL, I was an ML Engineer at Sokhan AI, where we provided accurate and scalable Natural Language Processing (NLP) and Computer Vision (CV) services to businesses.

Hassan Ghasemzadeh
Hassan Ghasemzadeh
Director

Hassan Ghasemzadeh (Zadeh) is an Associate Professor of Computer Science in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Washington State University (WSU). Prior to joining WSU in 2014, he was a Research Manager at the UCLA Wireless Health Institute and an Adjunct Professor of Biomedical Informatics at San Diego State University. He received his Ph.D. in Computer Engineering from the University of Texas at Dallas in 2010, and spent the academic year 2010-2011 as a Postdoctoral Fellow at the West Health Institute. He was Founding Chair of Computer Science and Engineering Department at Azad University, Damavand, 2003-2006. He received his M.S. degree in Computer Engineering from University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran, in 2001 and his B.S. degree in Computer Engineering from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran, Iran in 1998. He received the 2019 WSU GPSA Academic Advisor Excellence Award, 2018 NSF CAREER Award, 2018 WSU EECS Early Career Award, 2018 WSU VCEA Outstanding Communication, Connection, and Engagement Award, 2016 NSF CRII Award, and 2011 IEEE RTAS Best Paper Award.